Lost truths of history

Image courtesy of NativeVillage.org

Last year I learned the truth of Thanksgiving for the first time. The truth of Thanksgiving bares almost no resemblance to the “fairy tale” I was taught in elementary school. What I learned and what they still teach children today does not properly honor the Wampanoags, the Native American people who aided the Pilgrims of Plymouth. This lack of knowledge about the true story of this American “holiday” has to be corrected.

I do not believe that my words can do the true history justice so I implore you to read the articles I have linked. Then you too will know one of the many lost and mis-told truths of history regarding Native Americans. The more education there is about the true past, the better everyone’s future will be.

How Do Native Americans Really Feel About Thanksgiving?

Exploring Thanksgiving History in Massachusetts

Do American Indians Celebrate Thanksgiving?

Captured: 1614 – New Exhibit Focuses on Wampanoag Story

THANKSGIVING: THE NATIONAL DAY OF MOURNING

Thanksgiving: A National Day of Mourning for Indians

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It’s in the cards – Being less of a hermit

Sentinel Sculpture photo courtesy of RIT Big Shot. This was near the building that housed tonight’s event.

During my tarot card reading, she told me that it was time for me to get out more and be less hermit-like. Perfectly reasonable advice, but something I often have trouble with. When I’m in New England, I’m not in my hotel much unless the weather is bad and even then, I find somewhere to go and something to do. Where I live in Upstate NY isn’t nearly as exciting in my opinion, so I spend a lot of my alone time at home working, hanging with my pup Jazzmin, and now that I have Angel and Daisy, snuggling with kittens.

I’m happy in my own little comfort zone but the tarot reader insisted I really need to get out more and share my light with the world. As a step toward following that advice, I drove to the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) this evening for an event entitled “Onondaga Land Rights/ Two Row Wampum Film Screening and Discussion.” I just learned about the event a few day’s ago but as I’m on an eternal quest to increase my knowledge of everything pertaining to Native American past, present, and future, it seemed like the perfect opportunity to escape hermitism.

I will discuss the event in more detail when I’m less tired, but I’m very glad I went! One of the many reasons I decided to attend was because I’m trying to figure out a topic for my research paper in the Composition II course I’m taking. I know I want the paper to deal with Native Americans/First Nations People but my ideas were too broad and I was having trouble narrowing them down until I attended tonight’s event. Some of the topics discussed at the event were right in line with one of the directions I was thinking of taking for my paper, which confirmed that it is a universal issue among Indigenous People.

Something I’ve discovered as I learn more about Native American/First Nations People past, present, and future is that once you open your eyes to the truth and begin expanding your mind, there’s an infinite amount of knowledge out there to be found. I know with great certainty that I can’t properly share everything I’ve learned and continue my education by remaining a hermit, so I will be making a conscious effort to get out in whatever way required to shed light on topics that are near and dear to my heart and spirit.

Not my usual New England visit

Grand Entry at UMAss Amherst Annual Pow-wow, 4/19/2014

Grand Entry at UMAss Amherst Annual Pow-wow, 4/19/2014

During my last trip to New England I attended a pow-wow for the first time in my life. It was held at UMass Amherst on a beautiful Saturday and the experience changed me forever. If you’ve never attended a pow-wow, I believe you’re missing out on something very important to the past, present and future of this planet we call home.

I found the experience so meaningful that I decided I needed to bring my daughters to a pow-wow. I was therefore happy to discover when I looked at the Massachusetts Center for Native American Awareness (MCNAA) website that the Spring Planting Moon Pow-Wow is taking place May 24th-25th. As that’s Memorial Day weekend and I have the girls for the holiday, I immediately made plans for the three of us to drive up to New England over the long weekend. If you’re in the area this weekend, I urge you to attend!

My usual trips to New England run from Wednesday to Sunday and involve me driving around solo on various adventures, wandering Amesbury and going wherever the wind blows. This will be the first time it’s just us three girls on a road trip and I’m sure it will be a fun and interesting challenge! Jaycie has been talking excitedly about it ever since I told her and I’m sure Jordan is eager as well. We’ll make the most of our time in New England and undoubtedly have stories to tell for the rest of time.

My next New England trip will follow the usual routine and take place end of June or early July. As long as the weather is nice, I get out to Massachusetts and New Hampshire as often as I can because that is where I feel most at home and welcome. It’s going to be a great summer!